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Ben Brody's Flow State - all in the presence of subtleties.

Ben Brody's Flow State - all in the presence of subtleties.

Ben Brody's Flow State - all in the presence of subtleties.

Ben Brody's Flow State - all in the presence of subtleties.

Ben Brody, and his two saxophone players, Bill Todd and Alison Shearer, filled a large studio in Brooklyn with their music, focusing the crowd in on why they were there - to hear some kick-ass music.

Ben Brody’s ensemble Flow State, creates its magnetic sound by looping a solo electric guitar, adding in two saxophones that play circles around each other, an electric bass and a double bass played by Nick Lenchner, an electric keyboard mastered by Bryan Reeder and percussion by Andrew Zamudio. Ben said, “If you concentrate on it, you can feel every second, and the slight changes really shock you”.

However, Wednesday night, the crowd at Mister Rogers’ studio in Brooklyn got the rare chance of listening to Ben’s studied instrument, the French horn, get looped into the mix. Everyone was silent, something that never happens, even during the intimacy of a poetry session.

 

 

It’s no wonder Ben’s composition was undeniably captivating for his audience, I mean, he says things like, “I see composing as inventing. I have the same materials and tools as everyone else, it’s just how you put them together”. And, he’s right, not only did he create and master these incredible compositions, but he used the right instruments, and the right musicians to captivate his audience.

Ben’s idea for Flow State came from ‘being in the present’ and immersed in one’s thoughts or actions - an idea that so often gets lost in the business of day to day routine. Therefore, Ben’s idea is to create a flow that can keep the listener in the moment, not thinking of other things: “When I write my music, I don’t listen to it as a
writer, I listen to it as an audience member, giving me a different point of
view. I won’t listen to a song I wrote for about a week so that I don’t
remember the subtleties, and can successfully separate myself from the moment I
was writing”.

Composing multiple captivating pieces, including some for the Chelsea symphony, Ben expressed a unique and meaningful definition on how he defines success. Ben got an email one time, from a woman saying that his music reminds her of a special time in her life and it made her very emotional. Ben said, “That’s a goal. If you get that, you
get addicted to it”.

Looking around the room Wednesday night, that is exactly what he accomplished – a room filled with people, who were just present and absorbed in his flow of music; “Putting yourself out there in terms of, ‘this is who I am’. If you’re sticking around listening to me, I’m relating to you. People have the choice to not listen, but you will eventually find your audience”.

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Eitan Akman- 100 gigs to success

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